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Best of Philly 2008

Phoenixville Arts & Culture

Art & Independent Films
7 nights a week
Classics
Sundays at 2:00pm
Young Audiences
Saturdays at 2:00pm
Fright Night
First Fridays at 9:45pm
Baby Nights
Mondays at 6:30pm
Matinees
Wednesdays at 2:00pm
Film Discussions
Wednesdays at 9:30pm

Double Feature: The Dark Mirror and A Stolen Life

Directed by Robert Siodnak & Curtis Bernhardt. US. 1946. NR. 85 & 109 min. Paramount & Warner Bros. 35mm & DVD.

  • Sunday
  • Sun, Oct 7
  • 2:00 pm

The Dark Mirror (1946): Remember Olivia de Havilland, the lovely lady who played naive, innocent Melanie in Gone With the Wind, and was the “sweet young thing” in all those Errol Flynn movies? Well in this twisted sister film she gets to play both the kind, loving sibling and her cold, calculating murderess twin. When the boyfriend of one of the girls is murdered, it is up to psychologist Lew Ayres to try and figure out whodunnit in this tense psychological thriller. Miss de Havilland received much Oscar-nomination buzz about her dual roles here, especially for how well she played against type as the evil, disturbed twin. With fascinating noir-like cinematography and special effects, and a truly captivating opening scene, this is one of the most darkly suspenseful films of its time. Don’t miss it! (1946, Robert Siodmak, B&W, 85 Min, Not Rated) (Bill Roth) 35mm preservation print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.

A Stolen Life (1946): In one of the most popular of the “ladies’ movies” of the 1940s, Bette Davis plays twin sisters (one good and one not-so-nice, of course) in this classic melodrama, set in New England. When one of the sisters accidentally drowns while they are out sailing, her sibling, who loves the dead sister’s husband, decides to take her place. Then the surprises begin, and Bette learns that all is not what she had thought it to be. With a stellar cast, including Glenn Ford (fresh from his career-making success in Gilda) as the husband, Walter Brennan, Bruce Bennett, and Dane Clark, this is a film that will sweep you along with its engaging story. (NOTE: This is the first, and only, movie that Bette Davis, herself, chose to produce. Watch it and you’ll find out why.) (1946, Curtis Bernhardt, B&W, 107 Min, Not Rated) (Bill Roth)

Tickets

Adults: $10
Seniors & Students: $8
Members: $6