the colonial theatre marquee

Jane

Directed by Brett Morgen. US. 2017. NR. 1 hour 30 minutes. Abramorama. Digital.
Fri., November 10, 2017 thru Tue., November 21, 2017
Friday
November 10, 2017
2:15 pm
Saturday
November 11, 2017
2:15 pm
Sunday
November 12, 2017
2:15 pm
Monday
November 13, 2017
2:15 pm
Tuesday
November 14, 2017
2:15 pm
Wednesday
November 15, 2017
2:15 pm
Thursday
November 16, 2017
2:15 pm
Friday
November 10, 2017
5:15 pm
Saturday
November 11, 2017
5:00 pm
Sunday
November 12, 2017
5:15 pm
Monday
November 13, 2017
5:15 pm
Tuesday
November 14, 2017
5:15 pm
Wednesday
November 15, 2017
5:15 pm
Thursday
November 16, 2017
5:15 pm
Friday
November 10, 2017
7:30 pm
Saturday
November 11, 2017
7:15 pm
Sunday
November 12, 2017
7:30 pm
Monday
November 13, 2017
7:30 pm
Tuesday
November 14, 2017
7:30 pm
Wednesday
November 15, 2017
7:30 pm
Thursday
November 16, 2017
7:30 pm
Saturday
November 11, 2017
9:20 pm
Friday
November 17, 2017
5:00 pm
Saturday
November 18, 2017
4:15 pm
Sunday
November 19, 2017
7:15 pm
Monday
November 20, 2017
5:00 pm
Tuesday
November 21, 2017
5:00 pm
Ends Tue, Nov 21.

Drawing from over 100 hours of never-before-seen footage that has been tucked away in the National Geographic archives for over 50 years, award-winning director Brett Morgen tells the story of JANE, a woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world. Set to a rich orchestral score from legendary composer Philip Glass, the film offers an unprecedented, intimate portrait of Jane Goodall — a trailblazer who defied the odds to become one of the world’s most admired conservationists.

“Few films this year offer up such lush and beautiful formal components as “Jane” (Glass’ score is, to be noted, also very lovely), but Morgen has also made a film of deep emotional beauty, the kind of satisfying, stick-with-you fare that any filmmaker would love to make.” – Kate Erbland, IndieWire

“On almost every level, in almost every way, Jane is an exemplary work of documentation, storytelling, and filmmaking.” – Sarah Kurchak, Consequence of Sound

Access reviews at Metacritic.