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the colonial theatre marquee

Keep the Change

Directed by Rachel Israel. US. 2017. NR. 1 hour 34 minutes. Kino Lorber. Digital.
Fri., March 30, 2018 thru Thu., April 12, 2018
Friday
March 30, 2018
7:30 pm
Saturday
March 31, 2018
4:15 pm
Saturday
March 31, 2018
6:45 pm
Saturday
March 31, 2018
9:00 pm
Sunday
April 1, 2018
4:45 pm
April 1, 2018 to March 26, 2018
7:30 pm to 12:06 pm
Monday
April 2, 2018
2:00 pm
Tuesday
April 3, 2018
2:00 pm
Tuesday
April 3, 2018
4:45 pm
April 3, 2018 to March 26, 2018
7:30 pm to 12:08 pm
Thursday
April 5, 2018
2:00 pm
Thursday
April 5, 2018
4:45 pm
Friday
April 6, 2018
7:15 pm
Friday
April 6, 2018
1:30 pm
Saturday
April 7, 2018
4:00 pm
Saturday
April 7, 2018
9:15 pm
Sunday
April 8, 2018
7:15 pm
Monday
April 9, 2018
4:30 pm
Tuesday
April 10, 2018
1:45 pm
Tuesday
April 10, 2018
7:15 pm
Wednesday
April 11, 2018
4:30 pm
Thursday
April 12, 2018
1:45 pm
Thursday
April 12, 2018
7:15 pm
Ends Thu, Apr 12.

When aspiring filmmaker David is mandated by a judge to attend a social program at the Jewish Community Center, he is sure of one thing: he doesn’t belong there. But when he’s assigned to visit the Brooklyn Bridge with the vivacious Sarah, sparks fly and his convictions are tested. Their budding relationship must weather Sarah’s romantic past, David’s judgmental mother, and their own pre‐conceptions of what love is supposed to look like. Under the guise of an off‐kilter New York romantic comedy, Keep the Change does something quite radical in offering a refreshingly honest portrait of a community seldom depicted on the big screen. Rarely has a rom-com felt so deep and poignant. (Maryland Film Festival)

Sensory Friendly Screenings:

Tue, Apr 3 @ 4:45
Thu, Apr 5 @ 2:00
Fri, Apr 6 @ 7:15
Sat, Apr 7 @ 4:00
Tue, Apr 10 @ 1:45
Wed, Apr 11 @ 4:30
Thu, Apr 12 @ 7:15

“This is a landmark motion picture — a movie about people living with autism in which all of the characters who have autism are portrayed by nonprofessional performers who also have it. ..”Keep the Change is not a seamlessly crafted movie, but it’s awfully tenderhearted and thoroughly disarming. It deserves to be widely seen.” – Glenn Kenney, The New York Times

“The film, so devoted to the intricacies of the autistic experience, makes its comedy and pathos inextricable…But it’s difficult to imagine Keep the Change being abundant in such minor revelations if not for the filmmaker’s decision to have her autistic actors base their characters on their own experiences. A truly collaborative project, this remarkably earnest and keenly observant film offers a strong emotional resonance without resorting to maudlin melodrama.” – Derek Smith, Slant Magazine

Access reviews at Metacritic.